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September 20, 2022   •   By Justin Tyler Clark
Kiki Man Ray: Art, Love, and Rivalry in 1920s Paris
Mark Braude
She’s carried along by joy. She tells the dejected they’re worthy, only misunderstood. She promises shelter to the misplaced and broken. She plays to the lie that village folks are simpler and so wiser than city folk. She never strives for the sublime. Her voice is earthbound, she knows. If a singing voice could smell, hers would be garlic hitting a pan’s hot butter and wine.
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Justin Tyler Clark
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